COMPUTERS IN GEOLOGY

Geoscience Gateway

Need to beat the feast/famine cycle?

What can you find on this page?:
The time of hydrocarbon production centres of Australia.
The occupations of mineral surveying.
Job sites from mineral surveying companies.
or just select the gateway.

[The favourite icon for the Intelerad web-site] [The favourite icon for the Jobex-SA web-site] [The favourite icon for the Stantec web-site] [The favourite icon for the Stantec Australia web-site] [The favourite icon for the Aurecon Group web-site] [The favourite icon for the European Space Agency web-site] [The favourite icon for the BHP web-site] [The icon for the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, South Australia, which has the Office of Employment] [The favourite icon for the EarthWorks web-site] [The favourite icon for the My Easy Copy website] [The favourite icon for the Carbine Resources website] [The logo for the international Redpath website] [The shortcut for Geological Curators' Group website] [The favourite icon for Local Government Infrastructure Service web-site] [The favourite icon for Local Government Association of Queensland web-site] [The favourite icon for the Mobile Dewatering Pty Ltd web-site] [The favourite icon for the Vehicle Monitoring Systems Pty Ltd web-site] [The favourite icon for the Chevron job web-site] [The logo for Natural Resources SA from its web-site] [The favourite icon for the Energy Resources Australia careers web-site] [The favourite icon for the BHP Billiton web-site] [The favourite icon for the Flinders University web-site] [The favourite icon for the Woodside web-site] [The favourite icon for the Rio Tinto web-site] [The favourite icon for the Rig Zone web-site] [The favourite icon for the HydroPlan web-site] [The favourite icon for the Success Factors web-site] [The favourite icon for the Commonwealth of Australia Department of Defence careers web-site] [The favourite icon for the Seek.com.au web-site] [The logo for the company Rio Tinto] [The favourite icon for the Kisters web-site showing the Hydstra software] [The favourite icon for the CGG web-site] [The favourite icon for the Commonwealth of Australia] [The favourite icon for MADEC] [The favourite icon of GHD] [The favourite icon for CSIRO jobs web-site] [The favourite icon for JobSearch, Commonwealth of Australia] [The favourite icon for CareerOne] [The favourite icon for KBR] [The favourite icon for Adzuna.com.au] [The favourite icon for the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority] [The favourite icon of the Halliburton web-site] [The favourite icon of the Bentley web-site]

Barrow Island Palm Valley Moomba Roma Longford

Do you have an interest in any of these occupations?

In November 2007 edition of 'The Great Australian Byte' (ISSN 1325-3700) the newsletter of the Australian Geoscience Information Association (Inc), gave an abstract of the presentation, entitled "Data Storage and Management: Confusion between the two", given by Joanna Pearson of Maxwell Geoservices ( www.maxwellgeoservices.com.au). It featured the following paragraph:

Good management comes from people who drive the system, who understand the requirements and the purpose of collecting and reporting on the data. Guidelines for what we should be recording and reporting are laid out in the JORC Code. Therefore good data managment should be driven by the JORC guidelines, even for exploration projects. Do your data management practises follow these guidelines?

Joanna is a world-leading practitioner in the mining industry. She is talking to a professional audience and there is a good deal of understatemnt and cryptic language in the quote. The JORC Code mentioned by Joanna is protocol used to report ore reserves and the progress of mining for companies listed on the Australian stock exchange (ASX) and is one of only few codes taken seriously by multi-national companies. The "good management" is the handling of billions of dollars of investment, and the "collecting ad reporting" refers to technologies which match the sophistication of the space/defence industry. The general process Joanna is writing about incorporates a large range of jobs some of which I have written up in Table 1. The thing about the professions in Table 1 is that they don't actually do anything apart from collect data and report, but the conceptual rehearsal of the consumption of a limited resource has been a part of human activity since the early cave paintings recorded the abundance of food, water (the first mineral to be exploited) and shelter. If you are interested in any of these activities, then you are interested in the modern equivalent of what 200 years ago was called mineral surveying and the profession that the pharoahs of Egypt called 'scribes of the field'.

The table includes links to films portraying geologists at work. For dramatic effect they show de-skilling of curatorial positions (Idiocracy), subjected to undue influence (Quantum of Solace), sexual intercourse on field trips (A Japanese Story), endangering colleagues in rock falls (Thunderbirds are Go), charging exorbitant fees (A Civil Action), and the socially awkward (2012). These things do happen plus more, but to maintain behaviour, ethical and intellectual standards scientists use peer-to-peer review through scientific and professional societies. In practice this includes lectures, training courses, encouragement awards, and accreditation which occur at the conferences shown in the table of the Search page. Importantly, the representation of women geologists on film is disproportionate; there are a lot more women geologists than this survey indicates.

Table 1 published reports with contributions by different mineral surveying occupations
STRUCTURED WRITING
(HYPO)THESIS

Professor Kyle, was saved having to read several theses, when the androids melted her students in the Earthshock episode of Dr Who.

ACT PRESCRIPTION

The glaciologist, Doctor Peck, in the animated cartoon Thunderbirds are Go is collecting a specimen of bacteria frozen in a glacier. If he had been successful, the results would be first registered in a catalogue, before proceeding to select the DNA from the bacteria to cure his daughter's cancer. After this testing, a patent would be requested for the DNA sequence.

SCHOOL REPORT

In the video PANGEA 2016, Francesco Sauro at the University of Padua in Bressanone, has designed a course of exercises in field geology for the astronauts of the Eurpean Space Agency.

SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 5

In the 2008 film Quantum of Solace, Daniel Craig (as James Bond) impersonates the hitman Mr Slate played by Neil Jackson, who was in turn impersonating a geologist Mr Slate, who was supposed to be providing a sustainability report (in the aluminium suitcase) to the politician-in-waiting Camille Montes played by Olga Kurylenko. After a car chase Mr Slate the geologist is shown floating face down beside the wharf and Dominic Greene played by Mathieu Amalric explains he had him killed for trying to provide that report.

FEASIBILITY STUDY 2

In the vidoe Q&A: Russian mining sector, mining engineer Mark Chesher talks on feasibility study problems in Russia and how Australian technologists can overcome these.

PROSPECTUS 3

Some of the activity required in producing this report are shown by Toni Collette in the film Japanese Story.

DRILLING REPORT

The video Condamine Alluvium groundwater trial from Arrow Energy shows the activities in drilling a borehole.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN 1

The lead actor of the 2010 film Beneath Hill 60 Brendan Cowell, plays Captain Oliver Woodward of the 1st Australian Tunnelling Company, discusses the emergency response plan with his superiors throughout the entire film. In an early scene he shows a mine cross-section with a geological interpretation to divert groundwater from the mine shaft.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STUDY 4

As carried out by the extras in the 1998 film A Civil Action, starring John Travolta

SCHEDULE 6

The geologist portrayed in the 2009 film 2012, starring Chiwetel Ejiofor as Adrian Helmsley, delivers a calendar to the White House chief-of-staff, played by Oliver Platt.

CATALOGUE

In the film Idiocracy the "Specials" librarian Corporal Bauers portrayed by Luke Wilson reinvigorates a national irrigation programme by using grey water in place of artificial brine. When not being elected as President of the United States, curators of all types produce catalogues with indexes for computers and on paper.

COMPANY ANNUAL REPORT 3
Legend for document templates
1 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Brochures > Informational
2 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Import Word Documents
3 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Quick Publication
4 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Catalogs
5 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Newsletters
6 Microsoft Publisher 2003 template: Publications for Print > Calendars > Full Page > Photo Album Calendar
I print the 12 pages as landscape (default) and place them in an A4 sheet protector. This gives some protection from the rain and dust, if you are using standard weight paper, the cardboard from the back of a writing pad will prevent breeze bending the pages, and there are plenty of holes for pinning it to a door or noticeboard. Unlike the 1 cm thick paper report shown in the film 2012, a government data set is normally a DVD with some kind of animation or computer application to illustrate the changes. This film has amazing special effects but the most fantastic was that the chief-of-staff could critique a thick paper report, while drunk, tired and walking: usually one-page summaries are hard enough to get recognised.

[The logo for the Global Risk Solutions] [The logo for DelAir-Tech UAVs]

There is some novelty to Table 1

We rarely draw on cave walls anymore, but the alternative reports produced are shown in Table 1. These reports are shown as groups of a Venn diagram, with each occupation a member of the group which is associated with a particular report.

I find Seek and many of the other job advertisement databases slow to use because my skills are transportable to different sectors and even different industries. However, with Seek I have found it does match the keywords nicely to the name of position, so I keep track of the fashions adopted by human resources clerks, and add that name to the report category of Table 1. This is convenient, because each report requires some kind of certification or qualification so it saves a lot of cross-indexing of company sizes, qualifications etc. I will see how it goes over time. I have no solution and I don't ever expect to find one for the Commonwealth of Australia JobSearch site which appears to use categories from the Australian Taxation Office or the Australian Bureau of Statistics. As an exercise work out a unique solution for: educational publishers, web-site and print in South Australia. Answers can earn a free copy of the Grimoire of Geological Computing.

The legend of Table 1 is the Microsoft Publisher templates that I have used myself. Using Microsoft Publisher almost exclusively was not my idea. A drafter colleague, Chris Kay, encouraged me to try the Microsoft Publisher software in order to save me wasting time by doing design by trial and error. Of course at a later date you can always have the document contents worked over by a professional designer, but why not kick-start the process, and get the feel of what you want before you spend the big money? If you are interested why not have a look at the Computers in Geology Grimoire of Geological Computing for further details on how to prepare data and implement these report templates?

[The logo for Robertson Geologging] the logo for Spectral International Inc. [The logo for PetroLab PVT, the petroleum laboratory which has its headquarters in Adelaide.] [The logo from the  Scantech Limited (ASX:SCD) home page.] [The logo for the Minserve web-site] [The logo for the MicroImages web-site] [The favourite icon for Geoimage Pty Ltd.] [The logo for Coffey International] [The logo for Reid Geophysis resellers of Interepid Software]

Job sites from mineral surveying companies?

This first list is any employment page I have come across on the web-sites of organisations involved with data (including collection/acquisition); communications and information technology; and software vendors. The links are to the employment pages to make it easy to scroll through when you are in a famine phase of the consulting cycle and want to know quickly if there is a position.

[The favourite icon for the Onset website] [The favourite icon for the Visage Imaging website] [The shortcut icon for acQuire website] [The favourite icon for the Frogtech Geoscience website] [The favourite icon for the Spatial Dimension website] [The favourite icon for the Midland Valley website] [The favourite icon for the Mining and Exploration Australia and New Guinea website] [The favourite icon for the Xenith Group web site] [The favourite icon for the OreWin web site] [The favourite icon for the HR Wallingford web site] [The favourite icon for the Ex Libris Group web site] [The favourite icon for the QBE web site] [The favourite icon for the ESCIS web site] [The favourite icon for the Fraunhofer web site] [The favourite icon for the Prism Defence web site] [The favourite icon for the Imdex Limited web site] [The favourite icon for the Saros web site] [The favourite icon for Coreshed and Corescan websites] [The favourite icon for the Wolfram web-site] [The favourite icon for the Wolfram web-site] [The favourite icon for the MicaSense Pty Ltd web-site] [The favourite icon for the Schweers Australia Pty Ltd web-site] [The favourite icon for the Tenix Solutions web-site] [The logo for the MineWare web-site] [The logo for the Aristocrat web-site] [The logo for the RPS Group Australia-Asia-Pacific web-site] [The logo for the MicroImages web-site] [The favourite icon for the ESRI Australia web-site] [The favourite icon for the Maxwell Geoservices web-site] [The favourite icon for the Maxwell Geoservices web-site] [The favourite icon for the Hexagon Spatial web-site] [The favourite icon for the Tonkin+Taylor web-site] [The favourite icon for the CAE Mining web-site] [The favourite icon for Olympus, the camera and instrument company.] [The favorite icon for the Measured Group web site.] [The favorite icon for the OYO Corporation websites.] [The favourite icon for the Bureau Veritas web-site in Australia] [The worldwide glyph from Rolta India Limited] [The favourite icon for the AMC Consultants web-site] [The favourite icon for the RPS web-site] [The favourite icon for REFLEX, a division of Imdex Limited] [The favourite icon for FEI] [The favourite icon from the Intertek Minerals web-site] [The favourite icon for Woods Hole Oceonographic Institute] [The favourite icon for Golder Associates.] [The favourite icon for Subsurface Global recruitment.] [The favourite icon for IHS Energy website.] [The favourite icon for Schlumberger Software] [The favourite icon for Terra Search Pty Ltd.] [The favourite icon for the Microdrones web-site] [The favourite icon for the Trimble web-site] [The favourite icon for the SMEC web-site] [The favourite icon ABB website.] [The masthead for Borehole Wireline, the Adelaide based wireline logging firm.] [The shortcut icon for Flyability website.] [The shortcut icon for GAD Solutions, Geology, Applications, Databases.] [The favourite icon on the Groundsearch Australia web-site] [The favourite icon on the British Geological Society web-site] the logo for Sigra professional engineers and geoscientists.

These organisations have mineral surveying groups of more than five people and will take on those with more varied experience.

[The logo for Jacobs] [The favourite icon for the Dassault Systemes GEOVIA web-site] [The logo for Virtual Active] [The logo for GEOlogik Digital Corescan Systems] [The logo for Life Fitness] [The logo for AngloGold Ashanti from its web-site] [The logo for the BSI Group web-site] [The logo for the MathWorks the manufacturers of MATLAB] [The logo for Pentair from its web-site]

All statements and analysis contained in these pages are opinion only based on information from various sources. The Editor accepts no responsibility for persons acting solely on this information for any purpose. All readers are advised to get independent advice tailored to their individual circumstances.

This page was created in May 2002.
© 2016 Grant Jacquier, All rights reserved